BEATBOT

The future of faster.  

Ahead of the 2016 Summer Olympics, PUMA sought to do something radical for their very literal front runner, Usain Bolt, by creating a raceable robot for training. Based on the idea of exploring beyond wearable technologies, 10XBeta was commissioned by JWT to develop "raceable" tech for PUMA. At the time, Carnegie Mellon had built the fastest computer vision robot, which topped out at 15 miles per hour. The Beatbot would need to travel at least 30 miles per hour to challenge the fastest man on earth. 

This was a design and engineering challenge we could not refuse.

 
 
3059417-poster-1280-puma-beatbot.jpg
 
 
 

Brief.

Isn’t there something other than a stopwatch or the Fitbit? Build a raceable pace car that is as fast or faster than Usain Bolt.

 
 

Process.

Parallel tracking of software and mechanical engineering for effective testing and integration of systems never combined before. 

 

Solution.

An autonomous line-following race car that leverages cutting-edge computer vision and modified suspension to reaching 30 miles per hour on the track.   

 
Beatbot_White.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 

An autonomous line-following race car that leverages cutting-edge computer vision and modified suspension to reaching 30 miles per hour on the track.  

With the challenge set, we worked collaboratively across teams towards the goal of creating a pace car that able to race Usain Bolt at even his quickers burst. Starting with an off-the-shelf RC car, we modified the internal suspension and wheels handle the track at high speeds. 
We developed a series of tests to take over the steering control of the car, then applied line-following and computer vision systems with sensing controls to determine the orientation. The challenge that arose was sensing the car’s position, then deciding the steering instructions and implementing before the car was already too far off course. Initially, the car sensed every 1/12 of a second, which meant the car had already traveled 2 lengths. Balancing computing power and overall weight, we were able to get the car steady at 30 mph the car by enabling it to  measure every 1/500 of a second. The shell was designed to mimic the iconic PUMA shoe box, while optimizing for drag-transparency, cooling and downforce. 

After many nights spent at the track, Beatbot flew to Jamaica to meet with Usain. Can’t beat that. 

Currently, the BeatBot is not for sale, but it left the athletic community inspired.
 



Project Team

Design, Engineering, Product Management, Fabrication: Marcel Botha, Berk Ilhan, Simon Ellison
Software Development: Ranjit Bhatnagar, Bruno Kruse, Carrie Kengle, Mike Manh
Sensor Development: Bruno Kruse, Carrie Kengle, Andres Wallentin
Steering Integration: Yoni Saltzman
 

 
 
 
 

Beatbot_Grey.jpg
 

P R E S S

 
 

WORK > BEATBOT

<PREV  /  NEXT>